What To Never Say On A Voicemail

When you’re making phone calls and setting your sales appointments, there will be times that you’ll need to leave a message. Obviously, it’s preferable to do your best to actually talk with someone, but there are times that your only choice is to leave a voicemail.

Often times, your voicemail makes first impression – and you want it to be a good one.

As with everything you do, call your prospects – and leave them a message – with the intention that you’re going to get the appointment. You subconsciously choose your verbiage differently and it conveys a message that elicits a response.

In your voicemail, you’ll need to fit a lot of important information into a small time space. So choose your words with intention – and avoid these deal-breaking habits:

1. Don’t be impersonal.

Never leave a voicemail message with a prospect that is impersonal. If your prospect feels as though they got a cut and paste all-purpose message that you leave for everyone, you likely will not be getting any callbacks on that voicemail!

Dale Carnegie wrote in “How To Win Friends and Influence People” that the best sound in the world to anyone is the sound of their own name. It’s like magic – be sure to use it!

2. Don’t forget to include a success story.

Never forget to tell your prospect a recent success story!

If you are cold calling a prospect and their first impression of you is going to be the message that you leave behind on this voicemail, they need to know that you can deliver on your promises!

What’s your draw? What problem do you solve for them? Where is the proof that you can do that? Don’t forget to tell them!

3. Don’t ask them what their availability is.

Never say the words “Let me know when you are available.” Why? You’re making them work!

Make it easy for them to work with you! If all they need to do is check a couple of slots on their calendar, you simplify the process of meeting with you!

4. Don’t speak quickly.

When you leave your number, make sure you’re speaking clearly and slowly so that the person taking the message has time to write it down.

It’s easy to speak quickly when you want to convey a lot in a short amount of time, but keep your pace approachable and receivable.

5. Don’t say “Goodbye.”

Ending your message abruptly with an “ok bye” closes the door of communication on your end. What you communicate at the end of your voicemail will determine whether or not they’ll want to return your call. The way that you end the call should invite a call back.

What has worked best for you when leaving voicemails for prospects?

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